Up to three-quarters of patients receiving cancer chemotherapy suffer from “chemo brain” — a side effect that makes it harder to remember things, maintain attention, and learn new information. When it strikes children, whose brains are still developing, effects are sometimes long lasting, affecting their schoolwork and self-esteem. “One of the most distressing potential side effects of chemotherapy in children…
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Frederick Alt, the HMS Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, will be awarded the 2023 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize, Germany’s highest medical award. Alt and co-winner David Schatz of Yale Medical School will be recognized for their discovery of molecules and mechanisms that enable the immune system to recognize billions of different antigens. “The picture…
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Genomic Sequencing Analysis Gets Boost through Nvidia, Broad Partnership

It’s an exciting time for next-generation sequencing. Multiple new companies, each with their own emerging platforms and new technologies, have entered the U.S. market in the past year. Although there is a lot of uncertainty in many aspects of this field, everyone can agree that the future will bring a lot more sequencing data. And, as the instruments produce more…
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Why do so many people get heart disease when they get older? We know that factors like high blood pressure or high cholesterol contribute to heart disease risk, but they don’t explain all cases. A first-of-its-kind study from Boston Children’s Hospital offers a new lens on heart health. It shows that the cells of our heart muscle accumulate new genetic…
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An exercise-related hormone, irisin, administered to animals with a model of Parkinson’s disease reduced nerve degeneration and symptoms associated with the progressive movement disorder, say scientists from Dana-Farber and Johns Hopkins Medicine. About one million people in the United States, and 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s, which is characterized by tremors, slowed muscular movements, and impaired balance…
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Organoids serve as a novel tool for disease modeling in three-dimensional multicellular contexts. Static organoids, however, lack the requisite biophysical microenvironment such as fluid flow, limiting their ability to faithfully recapitulate disease pathology. Here, we unite organoids with organ-on-a-chip technology to unravel disease pathology and develop therapies for autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. PKHD1-mutant organoids-on-a-chip are subjected to flow that induces…
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The brain is often compared to a supercomputer, so who better to help neuroscientists figure out how it’s programmed—and how to fix any bugs in the system—than a computer scientist? At the new Boston University Center for Brain Recovery, computing and data experts are joining with neurobiologists, biomedical engineers, speech therapists, and other researchers to improve our understanding of how…
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Deborah Jean Anderson, PhD, professor of medicine, has received a four-year, $7.2 million grant from the NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development renewing support for a Contraceptive Research Center (CRC) to further her research to develop innovative monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based contraceptive and multipurpose prevention technology (MPT) products.
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Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can revolutionize cancer medicine. However, overactivation, lack of tumor-specific surface markers, and antigen escape have hampered CAR T cell development. A multi-antigen targeting CAR system regulated by clinically approved pharmaceutical agents is needed. Here, we present VIPER CARs (versatile protease regulatable CARs), a collection of inducible ON and OFF switch CAR circuits engineered with…
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Imagine you have 20 new compounds that have shown some effectiveness in treating a disease like tuberculosis (TB), which affects 10 million people worldwide and kills 1.5 million each year. You know that to treat the disease effectively, patients will need a combination of three or four drugs because TB bacteria behave differently in different environments—and in some cases, evolve…
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CRISPR-Cas Genome Editing Applications for Disease Modeling and Cell Therapy. Click to download.><br />
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