For the first time researchers have deciphered the near-atomic structure of filaments, called ‘pili’, that extend from the surface of bacteria that cause traveler’s diarrhea. Without pili, these bacteria do not cause disease. Knowing this structural information may lead to the development of new preventive therapies for the disease. Traveler’s diarrhea is an inconvenience to many in the U.S., but worldwide it…
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HIV patients could one day replace a daily pill for one that would last a week or more, should a new drug development deal struck this week prove successful. California-based Gilead Sciences Inc. (Nasdaq: GILD) is enlisting Watertown startup Lyndra Therapeutics to develop one or more HIV drugs that could last a week, allowing patients to take fewer pills. Gilead…
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Congratulations to the 2019-20 recipients of the Dahod Pilot Grant Program Fund, the Dahod Assistant Professorship and the Dahod International Scholar. In August 2008, Shamim Dahod (CGS’76, CAS’78, MED’87) and her husband Ashraf gave $10.5M to BUSM to establish the Shamim and Ashraf Dahod Breast Cancer Research Center, as well as these programs and endowments. Dennis Jones, PhD, Assistant Professor of…
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There is, thankfully, no age limit on innovation—you can do it at any age. But for many, “young,” counts as under 30, sometimes under 35, or even under 40, at least in terms of putting together lists of scientific innovators. Culling from a variety of lists that recognize researchers and inventors and company leaders under those ages, here’s a list…
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The New Trojan Horse: Using Tumor Cells to Kill Tumors

Our bodies have the natural ability to target and kill infected or malignant cells, and people have long sought to use our own immune system to treat difficult diseases, such as cancer. Such treatments are known as “immunotherapy” and have become one of the most promising advances in the field of modern cancer treatment. Specifically, our immune system uses a…
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MIT granted tenure to eight School of Science faculty members in the departments of Biology; Chemistry; Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Mathematics; and Physics. William Detmold’s research within the area of theoretical particle and nuclear physics incorporates analytical methods, as well as the power of the world’s largest supercomputers, to understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions of particles like protons…
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Nikolai Slavov, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Northeastern, has developed a data-driven technique to detect more than 2,000 proteins in a single cell. He says the new method could be used to help scientists develop therapies to treat cancer, diabetes, and other diseases with minimal side effects. Say you wanted to study how your smartphone works, and you grind…
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While androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay of treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) leading to initial response and durable remission, incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) invariably develops. Importantly, androgen receptor (AR) activity remains critical for CRPC tumor growth. Despite the significant research advances in PCa biology and development of next-generation antiandrogens, there has been limited progress in…
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Researchers in many fields of science and medicine engineer different types of human cells for drug testing and other purposes. They often begin with stem cells — unspecialized cells that have the potential to form many different types of tissue. By turning on certain genes, the scientists attempt to coax the stem cells into becoming a particular type (heart, liver, skin, etc.),…
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